This module is intended to provide students with knowledge and understanding of primary and secondary research, research methodology, research methods and ethics, and to examine the impact research has on professional practice in children’s and young people’s services. This module forms the foundation for the student’s secondary research based project (Early Years Research; Teaching Assistant Research; SEND Research).


Course Information and Documentation including:

Course Calendars

UoD Meeting Agendas

UoD Staff How to Guides

How to apply for a Late Submission Request (LSR) and Exceptional Extenuating Circumstances (EEC)

Prevent and Safeguarding Strategy Briefing

Link to the Centre of Quality Assurance and overview of moderation and external examiners feedback.

UoD Handbook for Collaborative Provision

SC Tiered Risk Assessment

This module is intended to provide you with the study and academic writing skills to engage in this Foundation Degree programme sucessfully by facilitating an understanding and application of higher level academic study skills in reading, writing, reserach and critical thinking.

In this Early Years Pathway Core Module students will understand the key concepts and approaches in Early Years provision. They will reflect on how these are applied in practice, evaluating the impact on children’s learning and development and the practitioner’s role. The notion of ‘quality’ and providing quality provision and practice will be a common theme in discussions. In the developing Early Years field, it is becoming increasingly important for students and practitioners to have an awareness of the many topics that relate to the provision of young children; existing, new and emerging topics will be discussed and reflected upon.



As a SEND practitioner you will be working in a context which is always changing and where there are opposing views about what terms to use and what practices to adopt. The language of special educational needs has become highly contentious and confusing for both parents and professionals. Health services refer to ‘disabled’ children; social care services to ‘children in need’; education to ‘special educational needs’ or, after the age of 16, to ‘learning difficulties and/or disabilities’.

 

This module puts terminology and policy into its historical, cultural, political and current context. It also explores how different ways of thinking about SEND (such as the medical model, social model, rights model) have dominated legislation, policy and practice in various ways at various times. It will help you to identify these different models in your own work and organisational context in ways that will support action for children and young people with SEND. You will also develop a clear understanding of legal definitions in this field and how and why they are contentions or debateable.

 

This module is designed to explore how the concept SEND came to be in the Warnock report of 1978, what learner group it identifies, how the concept sits in current policy, what criticisms have been made of it and what roles stakeholders have in the system. By engaging with this module you will work towards understanding some of the historical context for SEND and the way in which the concept is positioned in policy and practice. You will also understand why the concept SEND has been subject to much debate and criticism and how models of SEND and their discourses can create or prevent inclusive outcomes for children and young people.



In this Core Module students will recognise the importance of their professional development and the integration of reflective practice to enable them to become reflective practitioners within their work setting. Students will identify their professional needs and reflect on aspects of their work-based practice. This module forms the starting point for the student’s personal development planning.


As a practitioner in an educational, health or social care context, you are likely to work with the children and young people who are particularly vulnerable to the impact of negative attitudes, stereotypes and devaluing. This module aims to develop your theoretical and practical understanding of how personal, social and cultural factors impact upon the development of values, attitudes and identity. In this module you will examine how your own attitudes and value systems have developed and how these might impact upon your own practice. This will support you in applying the ethical, self-aware practices that might best enable positive outcomes for children and young people.

On successful completion of the module, students will be able to:

LO1 Evidence an understanding of the processes of attitude formation, reinforcement and change and the impact of these on individuals and groups within a specified context.

LO2 Reflect on personal, social and cultural factors affecting your own identity and the impact that these factors have had on your professional practice.


In this core module students will develop an understanding of current legislation, policy and practice in the implementation of an integrated children and young people’s service. The value of practitioners working together in a multi – professional way to provide for the needs of children, young people and their families will be explored.


The many ways children and young people communicate, learn and develop through a range of contexts and the practitioner’s role in this provision is examined. Through work-based examples of practice there will be a reflection of provision. An understanding of underpinning theories such as Reggio Emilia’s process-led provision for children to communicate in different and individual ways and the Emergent Literacy approach will be examined.

The many ways children and young people communicate, learn and develop through a range of contexts and the practitioner’s role in this provision is examined. Through work-based examples of practice there will be a reflection of provision. An understanding of underpinning theories such as Reggio Emilia’s process-led provision for children to communicate in different and individual ways and the Emergent Literacy approach will be examined.

The following areas through which babies and children communicate will be explored:

  • Spoken language

  • Written language

  • Mark making

  • Literacy development

  • Books

  • Stories – spoken, written, read

  • Story props, puppets, boxes, bags, games

  • Dance

  • Play – sensory, construction, role play and drama

  • Creative activities

  • ICT

  • Media



In this module students will develop knowledge and understanding of children and youth growing up in a global society.  Students will become familiar with international practice in education and care and explore provision and practice in another country. Students will critically evaluate their own practice and compare/contrast with that of another country. This module will enhance knowledge, skills and understanding of international practice and provision in the children’s and young people’s sector.


This core module is intended to develop students’ knowledge of theoretical and practical perspectives on managing the behaviour of children and young people. Students will critically consider the meaning of ‘behaviour’ within the context of children and young people and the work setting, considering the impact of behaviour on holistic development. Students will develop an appreciation of an array of biological and environmental influences on children’s and young people’s behaviour, evaluating the relationship between these influences and the behaviours exhibited. Students will consider ways in which the behaviour of learners can be managed, critiquing approaches, strategies and responses to promote desirable behaviours.

On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

 LO1 Use a reflective approach to the work context to examine the range of biological and environmental influences which impact on children’s and young people’s behaviour, considering the relationship between these influences and the behavioural patterns shown.

 LO2 Present and evaluate a work-based behaviour strategy to manage the behaviour of children and/or young people.


This module builds on your previous skills, knowledge and enables you to explore specific or ‘traditional categories’ of learning difficulties/disabilities such as ADHD, autism, dyslexia, and those linked with chromosomal diversity (e.g. Williams Syndrome) in a critical way.  It looks at these within a historical context, including aspects of identification, diagnosis, educational response, myth and debates. The module also helps you to apply this knowledge into supporting these children in learning contexts.

This module aims to develop the themes you explored in ‘Introduction to SEND’ and will support you in evaluating and developing the work you do to enhance the learning and educational inclusion of learners in your specific context. This module will allow you to examine current issues surrounding identification and ‘best practice’ and place these within a historical and multifaceted context. It examines the specificity and diffuseness of disabilities such as ADHD, Autism and Dyslexia and what is known about these learners’ needs and how educational contexts might best enable their success, participation and inclusion. You will be encouraged to evaluate strategies to support their needs within a multi-agency model in a theoretical and practical way.



In this module students will develop knowledge and understanding of working with parents, carers and communities. The concept and value of ‘parental partnership’ and ‘parental involvement’ will be critically examined; this will include vulnerable and cared for children and approaches to achieving effective partnerships to support children’s holistic development will be discussed through work - based practices. On successful completion of this module, students will be able to: 

 Use a critical reflective approach to the work context to examine the concept and value of practitioner’s working with parents, carers and communities to support the learning and development of children referring to current research and practice.  Evaluate the impact of working with parents, carers and communities in an aspect of practice.